WAYS TO STUDY – How to get disciplined

WAYS TO STUDY – Study tips, Blog , Vlog, Articles, And more…:

    1. My first tip is what I am going to call a ‘daily goals list’. Write down your goals, things you want to change or things you want to do better in your life. Now, this alone is not going to make you do the work you need to do. Write down a plan, some steps you need to follow in order to reach your goal. Make the plan something you can do every day or something you need to do at least a couple of times a week. I for example wrote down that I want to do better in school. My plan to do that is to attend all lectures, revise lecture notes every day, summarize, etc. A list like this is perfect to create a daily planner because you know what you need to do. It has another use that I like even more: at the end of the day, I grab my daily goals list, and check if I did everything I need to do in order to reach my goals. Did I attend the lecture? Check! Did I revise today’s lecture? Check! If I didn’t do something, I need to give account to myself. Why didn’t I do it? How am I going to do better tomorrow? If I didn’t have enough time, I should plan more efficiently. If I felt tired, I have to go to bed a little bit earlier and relax more in order to get my things done.

 

    1. My second tip is to breaks your tasks down into chunks that are so small that you cannot find excuses to not do it. The task will take so little effort that other tasks that you want use to procrastinate on this task will take more effort than this task. (Does this make any sense to you?) By breaking bigger tasks down into smaller tasks, it won’t feel as hard anymore and it will be easier for you to get your work done.

 

    1. My third and last tip is to create a routine in your daily life to beat procrastination. The problem with studying (or exercising or whatever you are procrastinating on) is that it feels like a chore to you because it takes so much effort and you really don’t want to do it. By creating a routine (morning routine, after school routine, weekend routine), you will notice that the things you need to do won’t feel as hard as before because you are used to it. If you are used to studying for 3 hours a day in your weekend, it won’t feel as a chore to you but something you just do every day.

 

    1. Do what you love, love what you do. This is a quote from one of my notebooks and it is so true. If you do what you love, the task won’t feel like a chore to you anymore. It is not work, it is like a hobby. Try to only do things that you love and you won’t mind working hard on it. I for example love law so when I am studying it often doesn’t even feel like studying because I am very passionate about it. If you don’t like what you are doing: fake it until you make it. Pretend like you like it, even if you don’t like it at all. Your attitude towards something can change the way you think about it. To quote the movie Paris, je t’aime: ‘By acting like a man in love, he became a man in love again.’

 

  1. Just do it. This sounds so obvious but this is the one that is the hardest: just do the work. Open your books, grab your pens, and then do it. Stop thinking of excuses, just do your work. Sometimes you have to be hard on yourself. Of course it would be great if there was a video, a quote, a picture, a tip that would make you do the work but in the end it is you who is responsible for your life and for your actions. You can decide to be lazy all day and not do a thing, but you can also get up and face it that you have to work even if you don’t want to/don’t feel like it. You have one life, and you get to decide what you want to do with it.

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You’re distracted more often than you think – A Life of Productivity

You’re distracted more often than you think – A Life of Productivity:

Excerpts:

The average person is distracted or interrupted every 40 seconds when working in front of a computer. This is remarkable. While it’s easy to recognize that we live in an age of distraction, to me, this number is astounding. It’s pretty hard to do good, deep work when you can’t even focus for a minute.

 

 

In the timeline of our work, our best thinking happens after this 40 second mark.

 
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Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals

Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals:

Excerpt:

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Choose a specific goal that can be measured. Some examples: lose 20 pounds, write an 80,000 word book, save $10,000, run a total of 100 miles, or meditate 15 minutes a day this month (450 minutes total).
  2. Pick a realistic completion date. This is key. Choosing a date by which you’d like to finish your goal will let you define the pace you’ll need in order to achieve that goal. Make sure your date is attainable and realistic.
  3. **Use Excel or Numbers to design a simple, two-lined chart. One line tracks the pace you’ll need to follow to achieve your goal by the date you’ve specified, and the other line tracks your incremental progress towards the goal. Update this second line every week, or however often you choose. (I’m purposely not posting a template here—I have a good one, but the more involved you are in this process, the more likely you are to keep the chart updated.)

I’ve found it helps to print several of these charts and place them within sight—when writing The Productivity Project, I taped a chart of my incremental word count above the computer monitor in my office, another in the kitchen, and one in my bedroom.

I’ve found this tactic works for a few reasons:

You can make adjustments over time. This includes tweaks to your effort—to either work harder if you’re behind pace, or let up a bit if you’re ahead—as well as adjustments to the goal itself, if you’re finding that in practice, your plan is either overambitious or too conservative. (That said, sometimes conservative goals are the best ones because they feel much more attainable.)

You know when you can treat yourself. Goals are fun to make and achieve, but tracking your progress lets you know when you can let your foot off the gas a little, and treat yourself. It’s a pretty great feeling to both treat yourself, and know that you’re on pace to achieve your larger goal.

**Tracking your progress against a pace keeps you honest with yourself. My negative inner dialogue goes through the roof when working towards larger goals. I have the bad habit of talking myself out of achieving larger goals (especially when food is involved). Tracking your exact progress against a planned pace gives you some cold, hard data to reflect on how well you’re doing.

When you track your progress for your larger personal and work goals—especially against a predetermined pace—you’re more likely to achieve them. I’ve yet to find a better strategy to achieving the bigger goals in my life.

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Parkinson’s Law: A task will swell in importance the more time you allot to it [Video]

Parkinson’s Law: A task will swell in importance the more time you allot to it. 

Tip: Set tight deadlines and time limits for tasks. Finish it quickly instead of having the task looming over your head for weeks/months. Setting time limits lets you know how long you take to do things. You catch yourself when you get distracted and are not focused on your work
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Bullet Journal Post

thearialligraphyproject:

We’ve talked about how you can truly own your bullet journal by including pages which focus on your health, interests, acads, etc. We’ve also checked out layouts for your weekly spread. If you’re looking to make your planner or bullet journal more colorful and creative, you’re in luck because this part of the Plan and Play series will give you tips to help you do just that!

New to the series? You can still catch up! Click here to read part one and two.

Keep reading

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Bullet Journal Post

thearialligraphyproject:

Thank you for all the kind words you sent regarding the first part of the Plan and Play series! It turns out, I was very excited to launch it that I neglected to mention that the series will be composed of five parts and updated weekly.

Catch up: read the guide to planners and bullet journals (#PlanAndPlay Part 1)

For this part, we’ll go through a list of brands where you can purchase a planner or notebook for your bullet journal, what kind of pages you can add in your bujo, and how to layout your weekly spread. Are you ready?

Keep reading

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Bullet Journal Post

thearialligraphyproject:

When I first joined the studyblr community, I was taken aback with the amount of studyblrs posting photos of their planner and their bullet journal spreads. I’ve only known and been in the fandom side of Tumblr for years, so I found it really cool that there are others who share the same appreciation for keeping things organized and staying productive.

I began to post my own planner spreads and since then, I would receive a lot of messages every day about planners/bullet journals and how to set them up. I decided to create this series to give you an overview of the art of using a planner or a bullet journal (right on time for the new year!) and address if not all, most, of your questions. Hopefully, as we progress through the series, you’ll find that keeping track of your tasks and staying organized isn’t as hard and tiring as it seems!

In this first part of the Plan and Play series, I’ll be covering the basics of planners, bullet journals, and planning in general. So let’s start: a planner and a bullet journal, what’s the difference?

Keep reading

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