Dont Follow Your Passion, Follow Your Effort | blog maverick

Dont Follow Your Passion, Follow Your Effort | blog maverick:

EXCERPT:

Think about all the things you have been passionate about in your life. Think about all those passions that you considered making a career out of or building a company around.  How many were/are there ? Why did you bounce from one to another ?  Why were you not able to make a career or business out of any of those passions ? Or if you have been able to have some success, what was the key to the success.? Was it the passion or the effort you put in to your job or company ?

If you really want to know where you destiny lies, look at where you apply your time.

Time is the most valuable asset you don’t own. You may or may not realize it yet, but how you use or don’t use your time is going to be the best indication of where your future is going to take you .

Let me make this as clear as possible

1. When you work hard at something you become good at it.

2. When you become good at doing something, you will enjoy it more.

3. When you enjoy doing something, there is a very good chance you will become passionate or more passionate about it

4. When you are good at something, passionate and work even harder to excel and be the best at it, good things happen.

Don’t follow your passions, follow your effort. It will lead you to your passions and to success, however you define it.

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The Surprising Effect of Small Efforts over Time

The Surprising Effect of Small Efforts over Time:

Excerpts:

And thus another life lesson materialized, with applications to Mustachianism as well. And that lesson is that small efforts, repeated over time, will almost always surprise you.

It’s a natural weakness of the human brain that we don’t recognize this, because we have our leftover instincts of survival in the moment. But a ten dollar lunch each workday compounds to $37,600 every ten years. An extra beer or slice of bread beyond your base calorie requirements adds up to 152 pounds of fat* over the same period. A habit of being just a bit rude to your spouse in certain situations can brew itself into lifelong resentment and divorce, while a slightly different habit of patience and respect can keep you happily married for life.

For me, the habit of occasionally typing some shit into the computer has resulted in an enormous pile of articles on this blog. 360 of them, or over 1000 pages if you were to make it all into a (repetitive and poorly edited) book.  It’s a whole empire now, which automatically brings in readers and generates surprising quantities of money, and all caused by a series of individually insignificant efforts over time. And although things seem slow to me right now, with continued efforts I can surely make this place far better, finish the book that really needs to be written, and reach the right people. Then, of course, we can save the human race from destroying itself through overconsumption of its own habitat, which has been the plan all along.

So how can everyone benefit from this effect? By watching where your time goes, and making small adjustments to make sure most of those minutes are aligned with your real life goals.

Watching TV, for example, or playing massively multiplayer online games, can feel relaxing and even stimulating at times. But those hours spent relaxing and stimulating yourself can really add up, and when you tally the eventual sum of the life benefits, it ends up awfully close to zero. Many other leisure pursuits (complaining, ATV riding, shopping) often end up the same way.

The key is therefore to trick yourself into doing more things that are good for you. Not just more good things, but over time having your life be almost entirely good things.

Tiny things, like learning one new thing you were afraid of trying before. Fixing the screen on your upstairs window. Or taking a very short walk when you don’t really have the time or inclination to go for a real walk. Reading just a tiny amount of the investing book before you eat a tiny amount of raw vegetables.  I have some gymnastics rings hanging from straps mounted to part of the high ceiling in my kitchen. When I don’t feel like really working out, which is quite often, I will walk over and do just 5 pull-ups on those rings.  Over the past month or two, I’ve done this lazy cop-out routine about 100 times, which adds to 500 pull-ups, which is not such a bad thing after all.

Sooner than you think, you’ll find that your days are starting to change shape. These constant needlings from Mr. Money Mustache seemed annoying at first, but you will end up getting rid of your TV and replacing it with a library card after all, and poking around in the Reading List area of this blog. Over time, you’ll become a Self Improvement Machine, a miniature Dalai Lama with happiness beams shooting out of each of your orifices, which in turn shine onto others and make them happier. All in all, a surprising effect for such a small effort.

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Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals

Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals:

Excerpt:

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Choose a specific goal that can be measured. Some examples: lose 20 pounds, write an 80,000 word book, save $10,000, run a total of 100 miles, or meditate 15 minutes a day this month (450 minutes total).
  2. Pick a realistic completion date. This is key. Choosing a date by which you’d like to finish your goal will let you define the pace you’ll need in order to achieve that goal. Make sure your date is attainable and realistic.
  3. **Use Excel or Numbers to design a simple, two-lined chart. One line tracks the pace you’ll need to follow to achieve your goal by the date you’ve specified, and the other line tracks your incremental progress towards the goal. Update this second line every week, or however often you choose. (I’m purposely not posting a template here—I have a good one, but the more involved you are in this process, the more likely you are to keep the chart updated.)

I’ve found it helps to print several of these charts and place them within sight—when writing The Productivity Project, I taped a chart of my incremental word count above the computer monitor in my office, another in the kitchen, and one in my bedroom.

I’ve found this tactic works for a few reasons:

You can make adjustments over time. This includes tweaks to your effort—to either work harder if you’re behind pace, or let up a bit if you’re ahead—as well as adjustments to the goal itself, if you’re finding that in practice, your plan is either overambitious or too conservative. (That said, sometimes conservative goals are the best ones because they feel much more attainable.)

You know when you can treat yourself. Goals are fun to make and achieve, but tracking your progress lets you know when you can let your foot off the gas a little, and treat yourself. It’s a pretty great feeling to both treat yourself, and know that you’re on pace to achieve your larger goal.

**Tracking your progress against a pace keeps you honest with yourself. My negative inner dialogue goes through the roof when working towards larger goals. I have the bad habit of talking myself out of achieving larger goals (especially when food is involved). Tracking your exact progress against a planned pace gives you some cold, hard data to reflect on how well you’re doing.

When you track your progress for your larger personal and work goals—especially against a predetermined pace—you’re more likely to achieve them. I’ve yet to find a better strategy to achieving the bigger goals in my life.

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Done is better than perfect. Start before you’re ready! 💥 [Video]

Done is better than perfect. Start before you’re ready! 💥:

Takeaways:

  • Set strict deadlines.
  • Parkinson’s Law: The work will be done according to how much time you give it. And dragging it for too long expands the work and makes it more important than it really is.
  • Start before you are ready
  • Putting it out there into the world, announcing it (accountability)
  • If you set too high expectations for yourself and make it too perfect, it’s never going to be finished. You will give it too much time and care about it too much
  • You can always tweak it and make changes later on
  • Take whatever you’ve worked on, any projects you’ve finished as a learning experience. Apply what you’ve learnt on another new project. Keep improving incrementally.

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Parkinson’s Law: A task will swell in importance the more time you allot to it [Video]

Parkinson’s Law: A task will swell in importance the more time you allot to it. 

Tip: Set tight deadlines and time limits for tasks. Finish it quickly instead of having the task looming over your head for weeks/months. Setting time limits lets you know how long you take to do things. You catch yourself when you get distracted and are not focused on your work
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Bullet Journal Post

thearialligraphyproject:

When I first joined the studyblr community, I was taken aback with the amount of studyblrs posting photos of their planner and their bullet journal spreads. I’ve only known and been in the fandom side of Tumblr for years, so I found it really cool that there are others who share the same appreciation for keeping things organized and staying productive.

I began to post my own planner spreads and since then, I would receive a lot of messages every day about planners/bullet journals and how to set them up. I decided to create this series to give you an overview of the art of using a planner or a bullet journal (right on time for the new year!) and address if not all, most, of your questions. Hopefully, as we progress through the series, you’ll find that keeping track of your tasks and staying organized isn’t as hard and tiring as it seems!

In this first part of the Plan and Play series, I’ll be covering the basics of planners, bullet journals, and planning in general. So let’s start: a planner and a bullet journal, what’s the difference?

Keep reading

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Habit Stacking

Habit Stacking:

  • Original article by James Clear 
  • Builds on the Tiny Habits method created by Dr BJ  Fogg 
  • Make a list of your old habits and new
    habits; then match them up
  • Start small and don’t overwhelm yourself. For eg:
    • Flossing
      (new habit) after brushing my teeth (old habit) 
    • Doing 10 push ups (new habit) immediately after drinking water in the morning (old habit)  – Slowly you can increase the number of push ups once you’ve gotten used to this routine. 

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