WAYS TO STUDY – How to get disciplined

WAYS TO STUDY – Study tips, Blog , Vlog, Articles, And more…:

    1. My first tip is what I am going to call a ‘daily goals list’. Write down your goals, things you want to change or things you want to do better in your life. Now, this alone is not going to make you do the work you need to do. Write down a plan, some steps you need to follow in order to reach your goal. Make the plan something you can do every day or something you need to do at least a couple of times a week. I for example wrote down that I want to do better in school. My plan to do that is to attend all lectures, revise lecture notes every day, summarize, etc. A list like this is perfect to create a daily planner because you know what you need to do. It has another use that I like even more: at the end of the day, I grab my daily goals list, and check if I did everything I need to do in order to reach my goals. Did I attend the lecture? Check! Did I revise today’s lecture? Check! If I didn’t do something, I need to give account to myself. Why didn’t I do it? How am I going to do better tomorrow? If I didn’t have enough time, I should plan more efficiently. If I felt tired, I have to go to bed a little bit earlier and relax more in order to get my things done.

 

    1. My second tip is to breaks your tasks down into chunks that are so small that you cannot find excuses to not do it. The task will take so little effort that other tasks that you want use to procrastinate on this task will take more effort than this task. (Does this make any sense to you?) By breaking bigger tasks down into smaller tasks, it won’t feel as hard anymore and it will be easier for you to get your work done.

 

    1. My third and last tip is to create a routine in your daily life to beat procrastination. The problem with studying (or exercising or whatever you are procrastinating on) is that it feels like a chore to you because it takes so much effort and you really don’t want to do it. By creating a routine (morning routine, after school routine, weekend routine), you will notice that the things you need to do won’t feel as hard as before because you are used to it. If you are used to studying for 3 hours a day in your weekend, it won’t feel as a chore to you but something you just do every day.

 

    1. Do what you love, love what you do. This is a quote from one of my notebooks and it is so true. If you do what you love, the task won’t feel like a chore to you anymore. It is not work, it is like a hobby. Try to only do things that you love and you won’t mind working hard on it. I for example love law so when I am studying it often doesn’t even feel like studying because I am very passionate about it. If you don’t like what you are doing: fake it until you make it. Pretend like you like it, even if you don’t like it at all. Your attitude towards something can change the way you think about it. To quote the movie Paris, je t’aime: ‘By acting like a man in love, he became a man in love again.’

 

  1. Just do it. This sounds so obvious but this is the one that is the hardest: just do the work. Open your books, grab your pens, and then do it. Stop thinking of excuses, just do your work. Sometimes you have to be hard on yourself. Of course it would be great if there was a video, a quote, a picture, a tip that would make you do the work but in the end it is you who is responsible for your life and for your actions. You can decide to be lazy all day and not do a thing, but you can also get up and face it that you have to work even if you don’t want to/don’t feel like it. You have one life, and you get to decide what you want to do with it.

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Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals

Here’s a simple trick to achieve your long-term goals:

Excerpt:

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Choose a specific goal that can be measured. Some examples: lose 20 pounds, write an 80,000 word book, save $10,000, run a total of 100 miles, or meditate 15 minutes a day this month (450 minutes total).
  2. Pick a realistic completion date. This is key. Choosing a date by which you’d like to finish your goal will let you define the pace you’ll need in order to achieve that goal. Make sure your date is attainable and realistic.
  3. **Use Excel or Numbers to design a simple, two-lined chart. One line tracks the pace you’ll need to follow to achieve your goal by the date you’ve specified, and the other line tracks your incremental progress towards the goal. Update this second line every week, or however often you choose. (I’m purposely not posting a template here—I have a good one, but the more involved you are in this process, the more likely you are to keep the chart updated.)

I’ve found it helps to print several of these charts and place them within sight—when writing The Productivity Project, I taped a chart of my incremental word count above the computer monitor in my office, another in the kitchen, and one in my bedroom.

I’ve found this tactic works for a few reasons:

You can make adjustments over time. This includes tweaks to your effort—to either work harder if you’re behind pace, or let up a bit if you’re ahead—as well as adjustments to the goal itself, if you’re finding that in practice, your plan is either overambitious or too conservative. (That said, sometimes conservative goals are the best ones because they feel much more attainable.)

You know when you can treat yourself. Goals are fun to make and achieve, but tracking your progress lets you know when you can let your foot off the gas a little, and treat yourself. It’s a pretty great feeling to both treat yourself, and know that you’re on pace to achieve your larger goal.

**Tracking your progress against a pace keeps you honest with yourself. My negative inner dialogue goes through the roof when working towards larger goals. I have the bad habit of talking myself out of achieving larger goals (especially when food is involved). Tracking your exact progress against a planned pace gives you some cold, hard data to reflect on how well you’re doing.

When you track your progress for your larger personal and work goals—especially against a predetermined pace—you’re more likely to achieve them. I’ve yet to find a better strategy to achieving the bigger goals in my life.

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Habit Stacking

Habit Stacking:

  • Original article by James Clear 
  • Builds on the Tiny Habits method created by Dr BJ  Fogg 
  • Make a list of your old habits and new
    habits; then match them up
  • Start small and don’t overwhelm yourself. For eg:
    • Flossing
      (new habit) after brushing my teeth (old habit) 
    • Doing 10 push ups (new habit) immediately after drinking water in the morning (old habit)  – Slowly you can increase the number of push ups once you’ve gotten used to this routine. 

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Where do you see yourself in 5 minutes?

Where do you see yourself in 5 minutes?:Some excerpts:

  • I’ve discovered when it comes to planning the future: the shorter the time span, the more important having a plan becomes. 
  • That’s why I go with one year. You should have some idea of where you’ll be and what you’ll be doing 12 months out. That’s what makes it a realistic amount of time to plan for. I find the Rule of 3, works remarkably well for this—forming three intentions for the year, quarter, month, week, and then yes, for today. 
  • The most important decision we can make in a day is to focus on the most productive task in any given moment.

  • Some ways to train your mind to focus on what’s important in the moment. Here are a few of my favorite ways to do so:
    • Eliminate distractions ahead of time. I can’t overstate this point enough: the single best way to focus better, deeper, and more clearly in the moment is to eliminate every distraction or interruption that will hijack your focus away from what’s important.
    • Set an hourly awareness chime. Once you start working, set a timer on your phone for an hour. When it goes off, ask yourself: what am I focusing on? How important is the task I’m working on at this very moment? Does it feed into my long-term goals? What can I do to work more productively and meaningfully?
    • Keep your daily intentions nearby. If you’ve adopted a daily intention-setting ritual, like the Rule of 3, keep your list of intentions nearby as you work so you can reflect on whether you’re staying on course. When a new, urgent task or project comes up, reflect on the importance of that new task relative to the intentions you set at the start of the day.
    • Keep a distractions or temptations list. Maintain a list of distractions or temptations that come up as you work towards accomplishing your daily intentions. If you’re tempted to refresh Twitter, put that on the list, as well as a comment about what triggered that impulse. If you’re tempted to check your email instead of working on a report, add that to the list, too. Dealing with the distractions and temptations on this list later will help you get back on track in the moment.
    • Invest in overcoming procrastination. Procrastination happens when we compromise our intentions. It’s worth investing in strategies to overcome it—like considering the cost of procrastination on your future self. Even though research shows that everyone procrastinates, there are several tactics that help us to combat it. Here’s an article I wrote a while back about 10 ways to do so!

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Planning Challenge

bohoberry:

#planwithmechallenge Day 15: Focusing

I’m trying out a new weekly spread in my #bulletjournal this week. This won’t be replacing my dailies but rather a supplement to it to help me focus on the big picture throughout the week.

I have tried weeklies in the past but found that I didn’t use them or refer to them as intended. I’m hoping that this one will stick but only time will tell.

One of the things I love about the Bullet Journal: having the flexibility to just test things out. If it works, great! If not, no harm no foul ☺️👍🏻

#weeklyplanning #bulletjournaljunkies #Leuchtturm1917

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Self discipline tips

marias-studyblr:

here are tips I discovered very recently:

  • something is better than nothing. 5 minutes of work are better than zero. Just because you missed something on your schedule doesn’t mean you can’t still work on it, even for 5 minutes. Grow and build on this.
  • second drafts / reviews can be done after.
    • Don’t think you are going to do your very best work on the first try. Take the weight of perfectionism off your shoulders.
  • don’t think about doing it. just do it as fast as you can.
  • build on your productivity, not your failures.
    • If you come from a past of procrastinating and now feel motivated to change and discipline yourself, do NOT try to do everything at once.
    • if you have a set of different goals to accomplish, begin with the most important one. Wait until the rotine of working for that one settles in (you feel productive and comfortable-ish), and then begin with the next. Repeat.
    • this way you’ll be building your way up and not juggling everything at the same time, hoping everything works out.
    • be patient with yourself, you’ll get there!
  • set smaller deadlines for your goals
    • have monthly and weekly-ish deadlines
    • e.g. if you are doing a project, due 22nd Feb, set personal deadlines, like have Introduction written by 2nd Feb, have Methods written by 10th Feb, have project complete by 18th Feb.
    • take them as seriously as you possibly can, don’t miss out on yourself.
    • write realistic daily tasks and don’t stop until you finish them. after them you can do whatever you want
      • on writing realistic daily tasks, the secret is knowing you can only do so much in one day, but trusting you can accomplish everything in the course of any period of time (a week, or 2 weeks or a month, etc.) because you will combine the work from all these different days.
      • it’s very tempting to write down all the tasks you need to accomplish in one day to just get over with it, but the real deal is you won’t accomplish half of them. You’ll feel very unproductive then, wich leads to demotivation.
      • spread daily tasks in the time necessary.
  • have a consistent sleep schedule.
    • if your mind isn’t ready everything will fall apart.
  • have one rest day per week where you plan nothing, do whatever you want except studying. this can be harder than you expect!

(don’t forget these are effective only if you actually put them into practice! good luck babes!!)

This is amazing advice and I’m gonna try them out

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